Update: Life on internal medicine

My internal medicine rotation is off to a pretty good start! I’m 2 weeks in now. I’m working at our VA hospital taking care of patients with complicated past medical histories. All of the patients that our team has taken on since I’ve been here are older men–many with poor lifestyle choices that have led them to where they are now. I’m slowly learning some of the many algorithms for treating COPD, heart failure, and kidney injuries. Since I’ve started, I have definitely grown more confident in my management plans for my patients, and become more comfortable being wrong. No medical student likes to be wrong, but I think it’s way better to still offer something and to learn why it’s incorrect, than to not offer anything at all–especially when it’s concerning your patient. I want to make sure I’m seen as an active participant in their care.

The residents and attending physicians I’ve worked with for the past two weeks have been instrumental in helping me along the learning curve. Every teaching opportunity is taken advantage of, and my questions are answered fully. At the same time, they push me to read and learn more on my own so they aren’t just handing me everything. During my evaluation with my attending, he was saying that my curiosity was one of my better assets. But he said it like three times, so in the back of my mind I wonder if he thinks I ask too many questions haha. I’m sure he meant well. But I definitely don’t hesitate to ask for quick explanations. I like to give a possible answer as I ask the question, so at least it seems like I put thought into it before just asking. Ex. “Is the reason why the creatinine levels spiked today because the patient is dehydrated? (even though that might be a complete guess)” vs. “Why is the patient’s creatinine up today?”

For our schedule, everyday starts at 7 and we’re on call from 7a-7p every 4 days which is when we get all of our admissions (new patients), whether from the Intensive Care Unit or the Emergency Department. On the other days we’re there until 4 latest, but I’m usually let out earlier. No one likes being in the hospital all day long, but call days are the best for me as a student. I get to go to the ED and see the patient first, work them up, and come up with my problem list and plan for the patient. After the resident sees them I’m able to report to them and we solidify the plan together. They teach me how to prioritize the different problems, the right wording for what I’m trying to say, and the right work up for the patient. I learn SO MUCH from just one patient (because they usually have a million things going on).



In other news, yesterday, I was inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society! They induct 15% of the medical school class based on nominations from our classmates and review of our CVs. I was so humbled that enough of my classmates felt so highly of me! And it’s amazing that there’s such a high honor given to students for simply being good people, no matter what your GPA is.


SN: Today was my first day off in a while. So refreshing, even if most of it was spent studying. I look at the residents and just wonder how I’m going to be able to handle the workload they have. Hats off to all the residents out there!
– Today was also the first time one of my patients died, ironic and sad that I wasn’t in the hospital to be with the family 😦

SSN: Congratulations in advance to all the 4th years matching this week!!! May God’s plan for your lives manifest in entirety.

ije long logo BLK

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