How I used my voice to make a difference at my school

I believe that as much as we are taught about path/pharm/micro and disease processes and how to work up different patient complaints, our medical education should also include discussions about unconscious bias and how it plays a role in our medical decision making. We all have biases that cause us to automatically think a certain way about a patient the second we walk through the door, and if we don’t recognize them, they can limit or alter the options we offer to our patients. We may also slip and say the wrong things to our patients (microagressions). Our biases can further perpetuate the inequities that are already present in healthcare. I realized that as a first and second year medical student, I didn’t get much exposure to this topic outside of a 3-day cultural competency intersession we had in the first year. It was actually our SNMA (Student National Medical Association) that was holding these discussions as opposed to them being a part of the curriculum despite the AAMC making such a big push for it in medical education.

So, last year I set up a meeting and made a pitch to the VP of our medical school about this and he agreed 100% with everything I was talking about and gave me his full support. But then he asked me to chair the ad hoc committee that was going to be making these changes. Basically he asked a 3rd year medical student to lead a committee of MDs, PhDs, and other campus faculty. I mean I had a lot of leadership experience under my belt, but never anything like this! But he had a lot of faith in me and gave me a lot of encouragement, so I said yes. Now, before the committee could be formed, it had to be approved by the big scary curriculum oversight committee at our medical school. So I had to present to them next. There was some hesitation and questioning at that meeting but in the end it was voted to form the committee and for me to be chair.

Since then, between all my working and studying on rotations, I’ve been balancing this committee. We had to do data reviews and literature reviews and there was a lot of back and forth about what we really wanted to accomplish. In the end, we managed to come up with a plan to actually integrate more discussions and teachings about unconscious bias into the curriculum, as opposed to the brief intervention we currently have. These recommendations were actually presented to the main oversight committee this past week (literally like a year after). They were very well received and I was pleasantly surprised to not get grilled as much as I did last time. So now I’ll be working with our Dean of curriculum to get them implemented, hopefully for next years incoming students!

I’m very proud of myself for stepping up to the plate and actually finding a way to make a difference in something I feel strongly about. My role in this arena led to me being selected as a 2017 NAMME (National Association of Minority Medical Educators) national scholarship recipient. I was also selected as winner of Augusta University’s Diversity and Inclusion Award last year. These are important to me because I’m being rewarded for pushing myself out of my comfort zone and making waves in an area I once felt I couldn’t even step into. So I write this post to encourage anyone who feels like maybe their voice as a student isn’t going to be heard over the crowd. Or maybe that opportunity is there and you feel like you don’t have the time to commit. That’s not true. If there is something you feel strongly about, there’s a reason why that is and you need to give consideration to how you can make a difference!

“The biggest rewards in life are found outside your comfort zone. Live with it. Fear and risk are prerequisites if you want to enjoy a life of success and adventure.”

– Jack Canfield


Have a wonderful week! 🙂

ije long logo BLK

Internal Medicine, a different beast

Finally internal medicine has come to an end

I have finally crossed the finish line of my internal medicine rotation. This was definitely the longest and most gruesome rotation I’ve been on. It was 8 weeks long which felt like 8 months. Usually you would do 4 weeks of general medicine (admitting patients from ED or ICU and handling all of their inpatient needs) and 4 weeks of a specialty–like cardiology, infectious disease, nephrology, etc.–that is more of a consult service (see patients for a specific reason and don’t manage any other part of their illness). On a specialty team, things are a little more chill than on a general team. I unfortunately ended up with 2 general medicine blocks. Each 4 week block I was allowed 3 days off–that was all. So I was just exhausted pretty much all the time, and I felt like I couldn’t make time to rest because I has so much to study (very unlike me). It was just terrible. I’m so scared to be a resident now after watching what they do.

tired the big bang theory GIF

I will say that I have a lot more confidence in handling various patient presentations. I can manage a COPD or heart failure exacerbation with my eyes closed. And I’ve gotten more efficient in writing progress notes each day for patients and in writing hospital courses for patients I’m discharging. So my countless hours in the hospital were not in vain. I’m thankful to have had good residents who were patient with me and took the time to teach me as much as possible. Now my hours spent studying on the other hand…those quite possibly were in vain because the way I felt while I was taking that shelf exam………

confused the big lebowski GIF

It was so hard! And I studied and prayed so hard and really pushed myself for 2 months so that I could feel prepared going into it, which I actually did! I was ready. But y’all, the makers of they test had something else in store for me that morning. I left my soul behind in the exam room as I walked out haha. Despite that, I still have faith that my God will reward my steadfastness with an acceptable score and I will rejoice in His goodness and mercy. I did my best and at this point, there’s nothing left for me to do.

This weekend was amazing because I was able to celebrate with both my friends and family. One of my good friends in my medical school class recently turned 25! Happy birthday again Jasmine! So on Friday, a group of us were in Atlanta for dinner and a fun night out at Josephine’s Lounge. Then on Saturday, my big sister graduated from pharmacy school! It was so awesome to bear witness to such an accomplishment. My parents came as well as a very close aunt; I enjoyed the family time. Today (Sunday) was a day for me. I slept in until after 10am, washed my hair, went to church, went grocery shopping and cooked for the week, and I watched some TV while I styled my hair. All and all, this weekend was a great balance and much needed to somewhat recover from internal medicine.

IMG_8652.JPG

IMG_8706.jpg

Next up is my Neurology rotation! I don’t have much interest in neurology, but honestly I’m just happy to have my weekends back and hopefully be working more reasonable hours. I’m going in with an open mind, we’ll see what the next 4 weeks will bring!


Have a wonderful week!
ije long logo BLK

Update: Life on internal medicine

My internal medicine rotation is off to a pretty good start! I’m 2 weeks in now. I’m working at our VA hospital taking care of patients with complicated past medical histories. All of the patients that our team has taken on since I’ve been here are older men–many with poor lifestyle choices that have led them to where they are now. I’m slowly learning some of the many algorithms for treating COPD, heart failure, and kidney injuries. Since I’ve started, I have definitely grown more confident in my management plans for my patients, and become more comfortable being wrong. No medical student likes to be wrong, but I think it’s way better to still offer something and to learn why it’s incorrect, than to not offer anything at all–especially when it’s concerning your patient. I want to make sure I’m seen as an active participant in their care.

The residents and attending physicians I’ve worked with for the past two weeks have been instrumental in helping me along the learning curve. Every teaching opportunity is taken advantage of, and my questions are answered fully. At the same time, they push me to read and learn more on my own so they aren’t just handing me everything. During my evaluation with my attending, he was saying that my curiosity was one of my better assets. But he said it like three times, so in the back of my mind I wonder if he thinks I ask too many questions haha. I’m sure he meant well. But I definitely don’t hesitate to ask for quick explanations. I like to give a possible answer as I ask the question, so at least it seems like I put thought into it before just asking. Ex. “Is the reason why the creatinine levels spiked today because the patient is dehydrated? (even though that might be a complete guess)” vs. “Why is the patient’s creatinine up today?”

For our schedule, everyday starts at 7 and we’re on call from 7a-7p every 4 days which is when we get all of our admissions (new patients), whether from the Intensive Care Unit or the Emergency Department. On the other days we’re there until 4 latest, but I’m usually let out earlier. No one likes being in the hospital all day long, but call days are the best for me as a student. I get to go to the ED and see the patient first, work them up, and come up with my problem list and plan for the patient. After the resident sees them I’m able to report to them and we solidify the plan together. They teach me how to prioritize the different problems, the right wording for what I’m trying to say, and the right work up for the patient. I learn SO MUCH from just one patient (because they usually have a million things going on).

IMG_8129

 

In other news, yesterday, I was inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society! They induct 15% of the medical school class based on nominations from our classmates and review of our CVs. I was so humbled that enough of my classmates felt so highly of me! And it’s amazing that there’s such a high honor given to students for simply being good people, no matter what your GPA is.

 

 
SN: Today was my first day off in a while. So refreshing, even if most of it was spent studying. I look at the residents and just wonder how I’m going to be able to handle the workload they have. Hats off to all the residents out there!
– Today was also the first time one of my patients died, ironic and sad that I wasn’t in the hospital to be with the family 😦

SSN: Congratulations in advance to all the 4th years matching this week!!! May God’s plan for your lives manifest in entirety.

ije long logo BLK

Trauma Surgery: Expectations vs. Reality

When I signed up for 2 weeks of Trauma surgery in my third year, I just knew it was going to be action packed. I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and be pushed to work under pressure. I even figured doing it at my institution would be the best place because we’re the Level 1 trauma center in our area. I really imagined it being a highlight of my clinical rotations. ABCs, ex laps, chest tubes, gun shots, all of that! I was ready. So just imagine the look on my face (well, the thoughts in my mind since I’ve learned how to save face) when my classmate and I meet our resident on the first day and he says “you guys don’t go to the OR on this rotation.” All my dreams were crushed.

Image result for expectations vs reality

We work with the resident who manages the patients on the floor. It’s our job to read up on the patients hospital course and answer the question What’s keeping them in the hospital? So I just get to read about all the crazy stuff that happens as opposed to being let in on all of the action. Basically feels like any other inpatient medicine service. We get to the hospital early to pre-round, then round with the trauma team, then follow up on what we need to do for the patients based on rounds. At this point, we (medical students) are sent home and the resident stays behind to man for floor. We don’t have access to put orders in so it’s really hard to be useful.

So am I learning stuff? Absolutely. Management of the complex injuries in patients with gun shots, stabs, falls, electrocutions, etc with different hospital teams coordinating their care is super educational. Right now, I have 5 patients that I’m following, and each of them are teaching me something different. However, it’s definitely not the experience I was hoping for. I guess it’s still a part of trauma surgery. But when you don’t plan on going into surgery, you really want to see as much surgery as you can. So that was disappointing. I did get to go to the OR once and that was for my patient who needed debridement of his foot wound (exit wound from a 14000 volt electrocution). I got a really good lesson/review about burns from my attending that day. (In case you didn’t know, there’s no such thing as 1st, 2nd, 3rd degree burns anymore–they’re changing the terminology to superficial/deep partial thickness and full thickness burns).

With my shelf exam coming up on Friday, I’m actually really not pressed to be in the OR very much anyway since I use every free moment to study, and each day is basically a half day. If I had this rotation toward the beginning of my 8 week surgery stent, I’d be pretty unenthused about it. I’ve just never heard of a surgery rotation where you don’t…go to surgery! But anyway, please keep me in your prayers for my shelf exam this week! I’ll write another post about my study resources/schedule for my preparation, but for now it’s back to work!


Thank you for reading! Enjoy your week! Subscribe on your way out if you haven’t already!

ije long logo BLK

Life in the fast lane

someone door GIF
Me trying to catch up with life

We’re 3 weeks in to 2018 and I already feel like my life is propelling way too fast. During first and second year it was just one day at a time, one block at a time. Last semester for the most part was just one rotation at a time. But now all of that has changed! A week into January, we had to declare our specialties to our school and got advisors in our fields to help us moving forward. I proudly declared Family Medicine, which I’ll probably go into my reasons in another post. Then 2 weeks later they opened up the portal for us to plan out our entire 4th year! We have to determine when we want to do electives, away rotations, and our core rotations for the year. It’s a tad overwhelming for someone who barely even has a list of residency programs she’s interested in. I thought that would be my first step, but nope!

In the midst of all that, I submitted my application for STEP2, which cost me $1895 (should be illegal the way people make money off of us). I’m still traumatized by STEP1 and I’m already planning for the next test, which really shouldn’t be as bad from what “they” say. Meanwhile I’m only 3/8 weeks into my surgery rotation (which I have surprisingly been loving!) and I’m just trying to get through my UWorld sets and pages of Pestana’s each night!

Ish is getting REAL y’all! Everything is snowballing. Today I’m thinking about my surgery shelf exam, tomorrow I’ll be checking my email for the notification that I matched (in Jesus name). I’m excited to keep moving forward, but a piece of me kind of wants things to slow down again so I can wrap my head around it all and feel a little more control. I just feel this sense of unpreparedness, but everyone just says that everything is going to work out so not to worry. Easier said than done if we’re being honest. I’m a medical student, it’s kind of my nature to worry.

But these are problems that I’m grateful to have. Honestly, I couldn’t ask for better problems. I’m confident that in the end, everything will indeed be just fine, even if the path from A to B doesn’t look very clear at all at the moment. In the meantime, I’m still forcing myself to take things one day at a time, because I don’t have the energy to spend on stressing myself out, especially when I serve an awesome God. *kicks feet up*


#NoStress2018

ije long logo BLK

#YoungLadyWatching

Dear young lady watching,

I want to remind you that you were set on this earth for a purpose greater than yourself. You are not here by mistake. And the dreams and goals that lie in your heart are not there by happenstance. To reach your goals it will take an enormous amount of effort, but be confident that you are equal to the task because you have a higher power in your corner that can move mountains. You can’t give up because whether you know it or not, there is a #youngladywatching you! There will be voices in your head and doubt in your heart but you cannot let those penetrate into your destiny. Failure and rejection may come, but those things don’t determine your worth. Stay kind, remain humble, and always try to leave people better than you found them.

As a woman, and even more-so as a minority woman, you are likely to find yourself discredited, belittled, muted on your journey to and through medicine, especially within male-dominated specialties. You may not look like the majority of your classmates,  professors, or preceptors, but know you are not alone! You may, like me, find yourself sitting in an operating room lounge surrounded by white male surgeons who move around like you don’t exist. The desire to pursue a highly competitive specialty may be met with skepticism. People will doubt your abilities and judge you simply by the way you look. But it’s important to know again that you are not alone. There are women going before you, and with you, reminding you that all things are possible for those who work hard and believe. I serve as an example of one, and I hope that just my presence and journey through medicine will inspire another young lady to choose medicine and stick with it.

  • 22% of academic medicine professors are women.
  • Women make up 22% of surgeons in the US.
  • African-American women make up 4% of physicians in the US.
  • African-American women make up 2-5% of surgeons in the US.

The path to medicine, though arduous, culminates into the most noble and rewarding profession. And there’s a lot of maturation that has to take place before I’m even worthy of those two little letters behind my name. I’ve grown so much in just two and a half years of medical school, and I look forward to more challenges and failures, but also more wisdom and success. The best thing is that I’ve learned to put my wellbeing first and actually enjoy this crazy ride, and I encourage you to do the same.

DSC03950.jpg

This post was inspired by two family medicine physicians Dr. Lauren Powell and Dr. Kristamarie Collman who recently began the #youngladywatching movement on Instagram to empower women in medicine. I’m the young lady looking up to them and I wanted to uplift those watching me. Search the hashtag to find more inspiring stories!

How to incorporate STEP1 studying into the spring semester

For second year medical students, there’s a looming dark cloud that is seemingly getting closer and closer with each passing month–STEP1. Everyone’s been talking about it since you got in and everyone ahead of you, even physicians, tells you that it was the darkest period of their medical school career (which I agree). So now it’s happening and panic is creeping in as you try and create the prefect schedule and plan to perfectly balance UWorld/USMLERx/Firecracker/whatever questions with school lectures. Hopefully this blog post can help simmer you out and give you a workable plan.

First of all, there is NO magic solution–you have to KNOW YOURSELF. This is what the first year and a half of med school was about–learning what type of studier you are. Because there’s a million resources out there for every study style. Videos, traditional flashcards, Anki decks, textbooks, etc. My first suggestion is to select your resources now and don’t plan to change them. People all around you will talk about what they’re using to study, and you need to be secure in knowing that you already have solidified yours. Those resources need to include at minimum: UWorld, First Aid, and Pathoma (UFAP). For me, I also included Sketchy micro and pharm, Goljan audio, and USMLE STEP1 Secrets (a textbook I used to supplement First Aid). I did not use a formal video course like Kaplan or DIT.

Second of all, you have to be flexible with yourself. The more rigid you are, the more stress you’ll bring on yourself WHEN you can’t keep up with your schedule. You will eventually fall off the tracks, that’s a normal phenomenon when you make a 6 month schedule. Don’t panic, just breathe, woo-sah, and get back to it at YOUR pace.

Third of all, when you need advice, seek it vertically, not horizontally. Your classmates are just as clueless as you are. You need to reach out to people who have dealt with this beast before to guide you.

During the semester, you need to familiarizing yourself with your primary resources (UFAP). Use FA and Pathoma to study the material you’re learning in class. Be familiar with the formatting and where to find certain information. I promise this will make your dedicated time much smoother. ProTip: don’t annotate too much. Now is the time to be incorporating board-style questions into your day if you haven’t already. I personally don’t suggest using any other Qbank for STEP studying than UWorld. Other banks can be used along with lectures to help you study for school exams. The UW questions you begin doing should only be on past material that was covered in the past semester, and newer material can be teased in as you complete your spring semester blocks. During this time, I suggest targeted question blocks (ex. GI, pathophys & path) because you may not have the knowledge bank to be answering q’s on 1st year physiology, anatomy, or random biostatistics questions that you’ll run into on random sets. Once you start dedicated time, random sets all the way.

The benefit of starting UW early is in learning the question style and practice in deciphering what they’re trying to ask you–which is a skill on it’s own. You won’t actually remember that much of what you’re learning from the questions themselves–especially not in January if you’re taking the exam in June. So I wouldn’t go too ham on Q review and note taking. You’re not officially STEP studying just yet. Plus you will do it all over again when you reset the QBank before your dedicated time, which you should absolutely do.

How many questions is enough? I would start now with 10 questions a day. This should take about an hour +/-. Remember, you’re not official yet and you still have school lectures to get to. I chose to bump it up by 5 questions each month. So I was eventually at 25 a day in April. Of course there were times when I didn’t keep up with this, but I did my best. I think I officially stopped going to class in March and watched lectures online. My 6-week dedicated time started May 1. If you have questions about planning that time out, feel free to contact me! Your dedicated time looks so different depending on the resources you’re using. There’s lots of resources online/youtube available to help with dedicated time schedule making as well.


Hope this helps! Please reach out to me for more advice and guidance!
Happy Studying!

ije long logo BLK

How you can make a difference as a medical student on rotations

We play a small but mighty role in the lives of our patients!

It can be pretty hard sometimes to find your place as a member of the “team” while you’re on your rotations. Speaking from experience, it’s hard to feel like I’m making much of a difference. After feeling good about the patient encounter and presenting everything to the attending (including the correct diagnosis for the patient), they come in and ask all the same questions and do all the same physical exam! Of course I understand why, but I can’t help but feel a little undermined at times. If you’re in a big hospital on a team with interns and residents then you might feel even more useless, because the students in training do all of the real work. I remember feeling lost in the shadows my time on a hospitalist team. Technically I was following my own patients and would present on them, but after rounds I was pretty out of the loop, unless I forced myself into it (and I didn’t want to be that girl). So it can be pretty frustrating. But rest assured, there are ways that you can impact your patients unlike any other person, as well as make a huge difference for your care team.

We’re eager and fresh in this new environment. We haven’t been jaded by the system and we only want to do the best by our patients. Our hearts tug when we hear bad news; we give people the benefit of the doubt; we believe it when they say they’re taking their medicine. This is such a meaningful thing that patients actually notice! There’s a difference in the way a medical student talks to them versus an attending. We show them the compassion, care, and empathy that they truly need and sometimes don’t get. There are times we can do more for them than all of the medications and tests that the residents are ordering. We have the time to sit with them and get to know them more personally. This especially goes if you don’t have to write notes after your patient encounter. More practically, there are many things you can do to be a rockstar team member: print rounding reports, gather new data on patients, do extra research on topics you or the residents may be pimped on, etc.

I’ll always remember on my OB/GYN rotation, there was a patient whose child had to be transported to another hospital while she had to stay to recover. It was so hard for her to be separated from her child. I came in during pre-rounds and was a soundboard for her to express her feelings. I told her that she was going to be a wonderful mom and that the time would soon come for her to be reunited with her child. I stopped in again later in the day, and as she was being discharged, she thanked me so much for being her rock as she waited for the go-ahead to leave the hospital. And she gave me the biggest hug. She said people just came in and out of her room all day and no one cared what she was going through. In that moment I felt like I did more for her than any of the nurses or even my attending–who really just signed her discharge papers.

So just remember that even though you might not have access to the computer record to look up patient info, or you might be the third person to take the same patient history, you really can make all the difference in a patient’s life. Our worth as medical students is unfortunately defined by how good our oral presentations and differential diagnoses are. But our worth as physicians is really in the connections we make with patients and in the rapport we build with them. That’s what makes all the difference. While learning to be good clinicians, we are also learning to be good doctors.

greys anatomy yang GIF


Have a wonderful week! Subscribe on your way out if you haven’t already!

ije long logo BLK

Life and Death

A week of palliative care has shown me a lot

I’ve spent a week on my palliative care rotation and boy has it been heavy. Palliative care is focused on quality of life and relief of symptoms, especially towards the end of life. I’m assigned to a nursing home, so not only am I exposed to end of life issues, but I’ve been able to learn about geriatric/elder patient care in general. I did a puzzle with a 94 year-old in occupational therapy and I saw a patient around the same age in her last days of life. It’s been quite the ride.

Earlier in the week I was part of a very delicate conversation concerning one of our patients nearing the end of life. It was a team meeting with the patient’s son and grandson. Our medical director asked questions like “how do you envision a good death for the patient?” and “what are your goals for the end of life?” They were trying to think about what the patient would want, as he could no longer speak for himself. Such a delicate time for the family.

Dealing so much with death and end of life has actually made me reflect a lot on life and how we all want to life full lives. And even at old age, after living a full life, death can still come suddenly to a family. There’s never really any way to prepare for that conversation. But it’s a reminder to live each day to the fullest and take advantage of all the ways you can make a difference in people’s lives. To pursue your passions and not put a hold on your goals for life. Because at the end, we aren’t all going to be blessed with the opportunity to plan out how we or our loved ones will leave the world.

As a future physician it’s nerve-racking to think that I’ll have to have these kind of conversations with patients and their families as soon as my first year out of school. So I’m happy to be getting the small exposure I am now so that maybe when I’m more important I’ll be able to guide a family through such a vulnerable time as this.


One more week of palliative care, then Family Medicine. Stay tuned. I’m excited for the week ahead!

ije long logo BLK

How to keep fighting the good fight

What do you do when you’re ready to throw in the towel?

It doesn’t take much time after starting school that all the excitement gets sucked out of everything and you’re just fighting to stay afloat. That’s not a very optimistic statement to make, but there’s some truth in it, especially in medical school. There are random moments when you’re reminded of why you’re putting yourself through such suffering, but they seem few and far in between, until you get to the clinical years. For the first two years of med school, lots of people use the swimming analogy: everyone is just trying to stay afloat. There’s times when you’ve got your stride and you’re cruising, and at some points (most points) you’re barely making it, swamped by the waves that keep coming and coming…and coming. It takes so much effort to stay afloat, eventually your body gets tired, and you want to say screw it. But you can’t. Because you’re supposed to get a couple letters behind your name soon, and you really want those letters.

So what do you do? Here’s some tips from my experience on how to keep fighting the good fight.

  1. Keep good friends around you–I don’t use the term friend here loosely. When Isay friend, I mean someone you can confide in, who knows your weaknesses, who you don’t have to explain yourself to, who only wants to uplift you. When we share our joys they are doubled, and when we share our burdens, they are halved. Medical school isn’t meant to go through alone. It’s important to have friends around you that can encourage you and tell you that you can do it when you don’t believe in yourself. Watch the people you surround yourself with, because negative, toxic friendships can easily add to hardship. happy dog sad hug adorable GIF
  2. Don’t rely on your own strength–We are all strong people, especially to be in this field. We know how to fight to stay up late or wake up early, study harder to get the results we want. But sometimes the fight just isn’t in us. Human strength isn’t always enough and we need to call on God to give us the supernatural strength and power we need to persevere. Surrender it to Him and let him take control. Staying faithful in the Word and strengthening your spirit can help you tap into that power on demand.
  3. Have an outlet/escape–It feels like my life is consumed by medicine, especially so back in first and second year. I found that it was actually harder for me to stay afloat when I convinced myself that I didn’t have time to refresh and do things I enjoyed. I would envy people who had time to keep up with TV series until I realized that they were making time for things to let their brains escape while I had mine on lock down. I learned that taking breaks can actually make your time studying more efficient. So when you feel like you’re ready to throw in the towel, do it. Refresh. But only for a little while.
  4. Give yourself positive affirmations–write them on your bathroom mirror, put  write you are beautiful writen GIF hem on your screensaver, leave sticky notes around your room, recite them to yourself every morning. Positive affirmations help increase your mental toughness, so when doubt, weakness, or negative energy comes your way you can easily block it out because you’re full or positivity. Examples include your favorite uplifting quotes, bible verses, or simple phrases such as: “you are smarter then you think,” “I am powerful,” “I’m going to be a doctor one day,” “You make the world a better place,” “you are important.” You get the idea.
  5. Trust the process–The road isn’t easy and it’s not supposed to be. This profession isn’t for the weak hearted. The process is meant to test you, sharpen you, grow you. We all struggle. When someone on the other side tells me that everything is going to be OK, it’s hard to swallow in the moment. But then I cross that hurdle and realize that they were right. When the going gets tough, instead of getting worn out, we have to trust that we will be better professionals because of this, and let our future selves motivate and pull us through.

Thanks for reading. If you liked this post, check out this one on Embracing the Journey! Subscribe below for more updates from The Balancing Act.